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Pupil Premium

DfE Guidance on Pupil Premium Funding  

The Pupil Premium was introduced in April 2011.

Schools can make decisions about how to spend the Pupil Premium funding to ensure that there is a narrowing of the attainment gap.  

The Pupil Premium provides funding for pupils:  

  • pupils who qualify for free school meals, or have done at any time in the past six years (£1345 per child)  
  • pupils who have a parent serving in the armed forces (£310 per child)  
  • pupils who are in the care of, or provided with accommodation by an English local authority (LA) (Children Looked After, CLA) (£2,345 per child)  
  • pupils who were looked after by an English or Welsh local authority before being adopted, or who left care on a special guardianship order or child arrangements order (Post CLA ) (£2,345 per child)  Schools are held accountable for the spending of these monies, and performance tables will capture the achievement of disadvantaged students covered by the Pupil Premium.  

Pupil premium strategy statement

This statement details our school’s use of pupil premium funding to help improve the attainment of our disadvantaged pupils.

It outlines our pupil premium strategy, how we intend to spend the funding in this academic year and the effect that last year’s spending of pupil premium had within our school.

School overview

DetailData
School nameRushbrook Primary Academy
Number of pupils in school501
Proportion (%) of pupil premium eligible pupils57.49%
Academic year/years that our current pupil premium strategy plan covers (3 year plans are recommended)2021-2024
Date this statement was published27.09.2021
Review date01.09.2024
Reviewed on:01/09/2023
Statement authorised byMatthew Carroll
Pupil premium leadSoraya Wallace
Governor / Trustee leadKate Shaw

Funding overview

DetailAmount
Pupil premium funding allocation this academic year£331,428
Recovery premium funding allocation this academic year£0
Pupil premium funding carried forward from previous years (enter £0 if not applicable)£0
Total budget for this academic year If your school is an academy in a trust that pools this funding, state the amount available to your school this academic year£334,452.91

Part A: Pupil premium strategy plan

Statement of intent

The school’s strategy for the 2023/24 year aims to address the following barriers to educational achievement among its pupils eligible for pupil premium. Much of the spending will benefit all pupils, and where need is identified in non-eligible pupils, spending may also be allocated to support their outcomes. Spending is reviewed at regular intervals for each objective to ensure it is in line with our expectations and the proposed plan (a percentage of funding has been left unallocated to account for fluctuations in the planned spend). Pupil premium target outcomes are set and data is tracked and analysed termly as part of pupil progress monitoring cycle.

Challenges

This details the key challenges to achievement that we have identified among our disadvantaged pupils.

Challenge numberDetail of challenge
1Lack of high-quality Reading and Writing materials in the home 60% EAL school population Poor parental understanding of how to support and help early reading and writing, poor language acquisition, low comprehension/ inference and deduction skills. High mobility, with low entry points (start & mid-year) High levels of deprivation & difficult home circumstances
2Lack of Maths materials in the home Parental understanding of how to support and help Maths’ skills development Parents educated abroad and using different mathematical methods to support children High mobility, with low entry points (start & mid-year) High levels of deprivation & difficult home circumstances 60% EAL school population
3Low Entry point/ baselines in Nursery and Reception SEND Communication and Interaction Mobility rate
4Experiential Audit showed limited enrichment opportunities outside of school
5Missed learning due to (COVID 19)

Intended outcomes

This explains the outcomes we are aiming for by the end of our current strategy plan, and how we will measure whether they have been achieved.

Intended outcomeSuccess criteria
Raise attainment and progress in reading and writing for children eligible for PP  Termly progress and attainment monitoring shows diminished difference between PP/ non-PP  
Raise attainment and progress in maths for children eligibleTermly progress and attainment monitoring shows diminished difference between PP/ non-PP. GLD, Phonics, KS1 and KS2 end of year data shows diminished difference from 2019-20 figures. 
Provide a wide range of enrichment opportunities to widen aspirations of children eligible  All PP pupils to be offered place in a full funded after school club.  PP pupils Y6 to be offered a subsidised residential experience. PP pupils to have opportunities to attend Forest Schools, Nurture groups and therapeutic groups.
Raise Communication and language attainment and progress in EYFS for children eligibleAttainment and progress data shows diminished difference between PP/ non-PP

 

Activity in this academic year

This details how we intend to spend our pupil premium (and recovery premium funding) this academic year to address the challenges listed above.

Teaching (for example, CPD, recruitment and retention)

Budgeted cost: £74,384

ActivityEvidence that supports this approachChallenge number(s) addressed
Reading, Writing and Maths Boosters in Y4, Y5 and Y6=  £16,365Quality of teaching is the single most important driver of pupil attainment and a range of other positive outcomes- EEF.    1, 2, 3
Whole Class Reading/ Guided Reading development/ clipboard reading/ 1-1 reading in EYFS (English leads, developing writing curriculum, providing training opportunities for all teaching and support staff, new resources) = £22,000On average, reading comprehension approaches deliver an additional six months’ progress. Successful reading comprehension approaches allow activities to be carefully tailored to pupils’ reading capabilities, and involve activities and texts that provide an effective, but not overwhelming, challenge. EEF1
Wellcomm Language Screening, staff training and staff resource time in EYFS. £20,000     Elklan Training for all staff and Level 3 training for key staff = £4220  The EEF toolkit suggests communication and language approaches are effective for developing young children’s expressive vocabulary and early reading skills learning, including their spoken language skills.  1, 3
White Rose training for key staff = £6,000     The EEF toolkit suggests that mastery learning accelerates progress. Work is challenging and is particularly effective when pupils work in groups and take responsibility for supporting each other’s progress.  2, 3
Phonics PLA training: SLT staff time £2,220 PLA UKS2 £862 PLA LKS2 £1,116 PLA KS1 £862 PLA EYFS £739Phonics has a positive impact overall (+5 months) with very extensive evidence and is an important component in the development of early reading skills, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The teaching of phonics should be explicit and systematic to support children in making connections between the sound patterns they hear in words and the way that these words are written. 1, 3

Targeted academic support (for example, tutoring, one-to-one support structured interventions)

Budgeted cost: £55,850

ActivityEvidence that supports this approachChallenge number(s) addressed
Communication Learning Assistant providing specific interventions for pupils with SLCN in each Phase. £15,400The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.  1, 2, 3
Whole school Phonics Intervention time: £22,000The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support. Phonics has a positive impact overall (+5 months) with very extensive evidence and is an important component in the development of early reading skills, particularly for children from disadvantaged backgrounds. The teaching of phonics should be explicit and systematic to support children in making connections between the sound patterns they hear in words and the way that these words are written.1, 3
Additional classroom books for EAL children £1,000 Linguascope subscription for whole school EAL teaching £360On average, reading comprehension approaches deliver an additional six months’ progress. Successful reading comprehension approaches allow activities to be carefully tailored to pupils’ reading capabilities, and involve activities and texts that provide an effective, but not overwhelming, challenge. EEF1, 3
Imagination Library £350On average, reading comprehension approaches deliver an additional six months’ progress. Successful reading comprehension approaches allow activities to be carefully tailored to pupils’ reading capabilities, and involve activities and texts that provide an effective, but not overwhelming, challenge. EEF1, 3
1:1 speech and language therapy £14,040The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support. On average, oral language approaches have a high impact on pupil outcomes of 6 months’ additional progress. EEF It is important that spoken language activities are matched to learners’ current stage of development, so that it extends their learning and connects with the curriculum. EEF Training can support adults to ensure they model and develop pupils’ oral language skills and vocabulary development. EEF Some pupils may struggle specifically with spoken language. Schools should consider how they will identify pupils that need additional support around oral language and articulation. It may be helpful to focus on speaking and listening activities separately where needed to meet particular needs. EEF3
1 Tutor Trust recovery tuition (Phonics and Reading in KS1) £2,700The EEF toolkit suggests that interventions matched to specific pupils’ needs can be effective, particularly when delivered through 1:1 or through small group support.  1, 2, 3, 5

Wider strategies (for example, related to attendance, behaviour, wellbeing)

Budgeted cost: £204,218.91

ActivityEvidence that supports this approachChallenge number(s) addressed
Parent education programme- staff resource time= £5,500  Parents play a crucial role in supporting their children’s learning, and levels of parental engagement are consistently associated with children’s academic outcomes.- EEF    Parental engagement has a positive impact on average of 4 months’ additional progress. It is crucial to consider how to engage with all parents to avoid widening attainment gaps. EEF1, 2, 3, 4, 5
Minibuses to enable enrichment offer (vocabulary trips) – PP pupil allocation= £2,750 £6,300  Adventure education usually involves collaborative learning experienceswith a high level of physical (and often emotional) challenge. Practical problem-solving, explicit reflection and discussion of thinking and emotion (see also Metacognition and selfregulation) may also be involved. All the above have been shown to have a positive impact on outcomes- EEF 1, 4
Subsidising of Residential Offer for Year 6 & Year 5 subsidy £4,890.20       Adventure education usually involves collaborative learning experienceswith a high level of physical (and often emotional) challenge. Practical problem-solving, explicit reflection and discussion of thinking and emotion (see also Metacognition and selfregulation) may also be involved. All the above have been shown to have a positive impact on outcomes- EEF 1, 4
Nurture interventions Senior Pastoral Lead & Nurture PLAs 0.5 x 2= £48,000 SEND coordinator time= £12,000 Resilience coach, developing teachers to support the self- regulation and resilience of the children in order for them to access learning. = £6,435The potential impact of metacognition and self-regulation approaches is high (+7 months additional progress), although it can be difficult to realise this impact in practice as such methods require pupils to take greater responsibility for their learning and develop their understanding of what is required to succeed. EEF Social and emotional learning approaches have a positive impact, on average, of 4 months’ additional progress in academic outcomes over the course of an academic year. This finding, however, has very low security, so schools should be especially careful to monitor the efficacy of SEL approaches in their settings. EEF The studies in the Toolkit focus primarily on academic outcomes, but it is important to consider the other benefits of SEL interventions. Being able to effectively manage emotions will be beneficial to children and young people even if it does not translate to reading or maths scores. EEF1, 2, 3, 4
Self-regulation (1 hour weekly) £1071 Mindfulness £1071 Talking and drawing £1071The potential impact of metacognition and self-regulation approaches is high (+7 months additional progress), although it can be difficult to realise this impact in practice as such methods require pupils to take greater responsibility for their learning and develop their understanding of what is required to succeed. The evidence indicates that explicitly teaching strategies to help plan, monitor and evaluate specific aspects of their learning can be effective. These approaches are more effective when they are applied to challenging tasks rooted in the usual curriculum content. Teachers can demonstrate effective use of metacognitive and self-regulatory strategies by modelling their own thought processes. For example, teachers might explain their thinking when interpreting a text or solving a mathematical task, alongside promoting and developing metacognitive talk related to lesson objectives. Professional development can be used to develop a mental model of metacognition and self-regulation, alongside an understanding of teaching metacognitive strategies.1, 2, 3, 4
Forest School PLA £17,637 New Forest School area and equipment £26,000  Outdoor Adventure Learning might provide opportunities for disadvantaged pupils to participate in activities that they otherwise might not be able to access. Through participation in these challenging physical and emotional activities, outdoor adventure learning interventions can support pupils to develop non-cognitive skills such as resilience, self-confidence and motivation. EEF The application of these non-cognitive skills in the classroom may in turn have a positive effect on academic outcomes. However, the evidence base linking non-cognitive skills and pupil attainment is weak and schools should therefore carefully evaluate the impact of outdoor learning interventions on pupil achievement, if this is the intended outcome. EEF1, 2, 3, 4
Music & Choir £4,400 & £2,678Due to financial constraints, many children may not have the opportunity to learn to play an instrument. In providing free music tuition and the performance experiences that go with it, we aim to help widen pupils’ life experiences and raise their aspirations.4
Breakfast club staff £16,181.21 Breakfast club food £2,000  The context of the school is such that many parents/ carers, including children with CP/ CIN/ EHA plans or CLA children are in need of support to provide for their basic needs. Children should be offered access to breakfast club and it’s provision of a free meal. All attending children will be provided with a breakfast/ morning snack of fruit, toast, yogurt and milk.1, 2, 3, 4
After school clubs (various clubs throughout the year) Breakfast club sports provision= £3,230 and £6,180Due to financial constraints, many children may not have the opportunity to join out of school sports clubs/ activities. In providing free after school clubs, we aim to help widen pupils’ life experiences and raise their aspirations.1, 2, 3, 4
Additional Apprentices to support in Phase 2 (2 x additional PLA, half time allocated to PP pupils to provide specific, additional support) = £36,824.50Tuition targeted at specific needs and knowledge gaps can be an effective method to support low attaining pupils or those falling behind, both one to-one: One to one tuition | EEF (educationendowmentfoundation.org.uk) And in small groups: small group tuition | Toolkit Strand | Education Endowment Foundation | EEF 

Total budgeted cost: £334,452.91

Part B: Review of outcomes in the previous academic year

Pupil premium strategy outcomes

This details the impact that our pupil premium activity had on pupils’ attainment in the 2022 to 2023 academic year. The tables below display the % of children (All, PP and Non- PP) at ARE (Age Related Expectations).  

Year GroupAllPPNon PP
Year 1 53 children 38 PP children 15 Non PP children
Reading64.2%  63.2%  66.7%  
Writing56.6%  52.6%  66.7%  
Maths66%  65.8%  66.7%  
Year 2 62 34 PP children 28 Non PP children
Reading77.4%  70.6%  85.8%  
Writing77.4%  67.6%  89.3%  
Maths74.2%  64.7%  85.8%  
Year 3 81 children (78 children with assessment) 48 PP children (45 children with assessments) 33 Non PP children
Reading43.6%  42.2%  45.5%  
Writing27.3%  28.9%  25.1%  
Maths47.4%  48.9%  45.5%  
Year 4 87 children 55 PP children 32 Non PP children
Reading48.3%  43.6%  56.3%  
Writing32.1%  30.9%34.4%  
Maths47.1%  43.6%  53.1%  
Year 5 93 children (90 with assessments) 57 PP children (56 with assessments) 36 Non PP children (34 with assessments)
Reading45.5%  41.1%  53%  
Writing25.6%  21.4%  32.3%  
Maths43.3%  42.8%  44.2%  
Year 6 90 children (89 with assessments) 48 PP children 42 non pp children (41 with assessments)
Reading71.9%61.4%  82.2%  
Writing69.7%  61.4%  80%  
Maths70.8%  61.4%  82.2%  
All Year Groups 466 children (459 with assessment) 280 PP children (276 with assessment) 186 non pp children (183 with assessment)
Reading53.6%  50.3%  58.5%  
Writing44.7%  40.6%  51.1%  
Maths52.3%  50%  55.7%  

As the data above shows pupils eligible for pupil premium performed less well than those ineligible for pupil premium. The most significant areas for improvement in 2022-2023 are attainment in Reading and Maths.

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Rushbrook Primary Academy
101 Shillingford Road
Gorton, Manchester M18 7TN
CEOP